June – The Braggot | Beer Style Exploration

What is The Braggot?

The braggot, while not often seen until recently, can actually trace its heritage to the late 1300s. At its most basic level, the braggot combines herbs, spices, mead (boozy drink of fermented honey and water) and beer. This tends to be a stronger drink that brings together flavors that you wouldn’t otherwise expect to work. Originally the blending of everything happened at the bar – fortunately or unfortunately that is no longer the case.

What does that mean to you?

It’s almost like an old school party punch that brings everything together in perfect harmony. The beer is definitely old in style but being refined in this newest incarnation. Not to mention the exciting things being done with barrels. The two beers photographed here are aged in brandy barrels and the one from Mockery has pear juice along with Huell melon hops for additional sweetness.

What to look for in a good Braggot

Visually: This beer will vary in color depending on its variation. It will have a minimal to a decent head and the colors can range from a lighter gold-like color to a darker brown color. It’s all about the additions when it comes to what to expect visually.

Aromatically: This scent should be all about spices/herbs and honey. There should always be a hint of both and depending on alcohol content the hint of whatever barrel and increased sweetness. Common spices/herbs are ginger, cinnamon, chamomile, and lavender.

Taste: Like the aroma, the taste will be about the honey and herbs/spices. They should assert themselves but not overpower – they should balance. Depending on the alcohol that will linger and the sweetness will become more prevalent.

ABV: This beer can range from 6% to 12% depending on barrel aging – it will always be above sessionable no matter the style type.

Style Variations

Sour

Fruit Variations

Barrel Variations

Colorado Breweries for Braggot Recommendations:

TRVE Brewing Company

Mockery Brewing Company

Trinity Brewing Company

 

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